23 Jan, 2023 - 02 Feb, 2023
Spiritual Landscapes
59th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia
Enigmatic and painterly abstract works
The artist David Guez exhibited his enigmatic and painterly abstract works at the prestigious Palazzo Bembo, during the internationally-renowned Venice Biennale. Presenting a trio of works, the exhibition provided a concentrated yet engaging vision of the artist’s creative practice.
Repetitive geometric marks
Through repetitive geometric marks, Guez creates rhythmic large-scale compositions most notably striking in their unique textured surfaces. His dynamic yet calculated layering of paint creates fragmented planes, evoking both elements of the natural world and unearthly landscapes. His featured works were affixed side-by-side, perfectly aligned, reading as a series with endless possibilities for interpretation. 
Ultramarine
is a monochromatic blue composition, with patterned strokes evocative of ocean waves. There is almost an immediate sentiment of the sublime, with the bottom of Guez’s canvases beginning below eye-level, rising upon the wall, with their summit reaching overhead. Viewers are thus immersed into his painting, floating in the middle of a vast oceanic range. With any indications of scale and perspective hidden–unable to decipher whether we are looking into a ripple or observing a vast expanse from the atmosphere–the work envelops us and takes us on a transcendent journey. This abstract piece alludes to an element’s potential to be both serenely meditative and overwhelmingly daunting. 
Haiku
named after the short Japanese poem traditionally eliciting images of the natural world, plays with texture in a different way. We can gather that this work is an ode immortalizing a venerable, and perhaps, ephemeral experience. Just as the structure of the ancient poem, there are three perceivable primary components that emerge from the work’s white-coated background:
A deep-red linear form near the top of the canvas acts as the opening verse, giving a framing structure to the rest of the composition. Guez’s quintessential textured marks, this time applied in gold, take over the majority of the piece, just as the poem’s longer second verse. The cryptic black ink mark floating in the lower half thus invokes a kireji, the cutting word typically present at the end of the verses. The single gold brushstroke above the visual poem reminds us that there was always something before us, with the painting acting as a contemplation of what may come after.
Spiritual Landscape
is a manifestation of instinct. The deep scarlet hue is visceral, representing an intimate inward journey exposed. The intense color is employed to create deliberate and intentional marks, of balancing passion and reason. The conception and realization of the painting thus becomes a tangible form of introspection. forms or symbols.
Italian art critic Paolo Levi...
Italian art critic Paolo Levi declared Guez a “master of vision,” describing how the painter’s work explores unknown psychological territories translated into a visual synthesis that–rather than imposes conclusive meanings–propounds ways in which viewers can contemplate their own inner mental landscapes. With each new regard, surprising details are revealed that propose new rhythms. Ultimately, the rigor of observation into Guez’s works heightens the opportunity to reach an undiscovered elsewhere.